MeerKAT Telescope Discovers 1300 Galaxies In One Go

[Under Construction Telescope Showcases It's Potential Power]

Telescopes are powerful tools that helps us discover new things about the universe around us on a daily basis. Whether it is a small one for personal use of massive ones with multiple dishes, these devices are essential for our dreams of space exploration.

To encourage these exploration goals, various countries over the years have helped construct highly advanced telescopes that use the latest imaging technologies.

These telescopes are so massive and powerful, that they are able to spot a huge amount of galaxies in a single image, thus helping us create a living map of the universe.

This technology of space imaging has been getting better and better over the years, to the point that now we are able to spot thousands of galaxies in one go.

The equipment responsible for making this statement a reality is located on a radio telescope located in South Africa, called the MeerKAT.

This telescope has just discovered 1300 Galaxies in a patch of sky which initially was thought to only contain around 70 galaxies.

What makes this feat even more impressive is the fact that this telescope is not even complete, currently operating with just 16 out of 64 dishes.

This already makes it better than any other telescope in existence right now. This superiority is achieved with the help of radio imaging, which is able to see past the space dust and see galaxies that the optical telescopes just can’t spot.

By achieving this seemingly impossible task with less than half it’s resources, this telescope has gotten the scientific community really excited about the possibilities of future explorations.

We too are excited to see what happens once the construction is completed, and promise to bring you all the news, as the story develops further.

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Posted on : 29 Jul 2016 @ 21:05

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